Today, we are excited to announce the winners and awarded entries for our second international ideas and design competition: San Francisco 2016.

The competition called upon students and professionals to develop a strategy for the regeneration of San Francisco’s Tenderloin district. The neighbourhood, which sits in the heart of one of the world’s most famous cities, is today regarded as one of the most distressed neighbourhoods in the USA. This competition called for action and invited the international creative community to step-up to the challenge and reimagine ways of turning the Tenderloin into a model district of the future.

We are proud to officially present the winning entries and congratulate all the participants for their fantastic ideas and designs!

So, Ladies and Gentlemen, without further ado, here are the San Francisco 2016 competition winners:


WINNER:

‘The Tender Track’ by ASPECT Studios –  Louise Pearson (Australia), Yiran Li (Australia), Matthew Drury (Australia) and Thea Harris (Australia).

‘The Tender Track’ by ASPECT Studio –  Louise Pearson, Yiran Li, Matthew Drury and Thea Harris.
‘The Tender Track’ by ASPECT Studio – Louise Pearson, Yiran Li, Matthew Drury and Thea Harris.

Described by the design team as “an antidote to everyday life”, the Tender Track proposes a sensitive and beautiful regenerative approach to the problems of crime, homelessness and poverty affecting the Tenderloin today. The proposal suggests a new mile-long free tram line for the heart of the Tenderloin, which connects a sequence of unique spaces together, each built and run by an empowered local community. The journey has three primary themes: Education Wonderland, Urban Wilderness and Grow Share Eat.

The jury loved this proposal from concept to presentation and particularly liked how the design team managed to weave together such an ambitious design in a coherent, contextual, innovative and yet feasible manner.

Read more about the project here.


RUNNER UP:

‘Urban Playground’ by Charlotte Durand-Rival (France), Chloe Durrieu (France), Simon Forget (France) and Emmanuel Chesné (France).

‘Urban Playground’ by Charlotte Durand-Rival, Chloe Durrieu, Simon Forget and Emmanuel Chesné
‘Urban Playground’ by Charlotte Durand-Rival, Chloe Durrieu, Simon Forget and Emmanuel Chesné

Described as a “resuscitation” by the design team, ‘Urban Playground’ is about channelling the Tenderloin’s individual identity as a key to its own regeneration. It is an update, not an upgrade. “We have imagined a scenario that combines technology, energy and a way of life”, explain the design team, “a return to basic needs with firm modern ways.” The proposal suggests three primary routes through the Tenderloin, each dotted with new public spaces and pieces of architecture which serve to reinforce several themes running throughout the design. The proposal engages with the Tenderloin at multiple scales – city, neighbourhood, block – and in doing so, successfully manages to create a comprehensive strategy for the self-revitalisation of the Tenderloin with the city of San Francisco.

The jury particularly liked how the team reimagined a regenerated Tenderloin through a re-invigoration of this neighbourhood’s existing cultural identity.

Read more about the project here.


PEOPLE’S CHOICE:

‘Art-Identity-Technology’ by PT Group Architects (Italy)

‘Art-Identity-Technology’ by PT Group Architects
‘Art-Identity-Technology’ by PT Group Architects

This project was selected by the general public as their favourite design from all the entries and is the recipient of our People’s Choice Award.

“Tenderloin is a district with an artistic vocation since its origin”, explain the architect, “with many areas dedicated to various spontaneous forms of art, including murals.” This artistic vibe was the inspiration for the design. Merging arts with technology, the design team’s proposal in to turn the Tenderloin into a living hologram park. People would be encouraged to venture into the Tenderloin and enter an art-adventure-discovery-trail. Through the neighbourhood – with the help of augmented reality – visitors will be able to discover hologram hotspots and watch holograms come to life! “Art and technology, considered synonyms, act in symbiosis to simulate urban realities, social, historical reconstructions etc.”, say the design team, “so, the imagination is part of everyday life”.

We loved this idea of merging art and technology together and using it as a way for people to interact in a notoriously cut-off area. This project shows how art and technology can act as 21st-century stimuli for urban interactions.

Read more about the project here.


HONOURABLE MENTION:

‘Tenderloin The Incubator’ by James Zhou (China) and Xinzhuo An (China).

‘Tenderloin Incubator’ by James Zhou and Xinzhuo An
‘Tenderloin Incubator’ by James Zhou and Xinzhuo An

Single Room Occupancy housing (SROs) are considered as one of the most problematic issues. This project identifies one of the biggest problems of the Tenderloin and works to convert them into creativity hubs in three stages. “The proposal envisions Tenderloin a unique district – redefined SROs, balanced community, and a district for incubating ideas” explain the design team. Stage One sees to redefine SROs, with a new eligibility criteria systems put in place designed to boost the occupancy of low-income talented creatives. At the same time, SROs are equipped with new facilities to maximise the creative outcome of their tenants, such as high-speed internet, creative suites, etc. Stage Two sees the community benefitting from the conversion of SROs into live-work units for creatives, as more business and tourists venture through the area. This allows locals to benefit from new opportunities. Stage 3 sees the success of redefining SROs into what the design team calls an “ideas incubator for talent and aspiring workers in the city”.

The jury particularly likes how the design team took the concept of Gentrification – traditionally seen as negative for the displacement of local population in favour of development – and turned it on its head. ‘Tenderloin The Incubator’ is about reimagining a new form of gentrification, which puts the local population at the heart of its success.

Read more about the project here.


HONOURABLE MENTION:

‘Tenderloin HABITat’ by Sylwia Gudaczewska (Poland), Piotr Ołowski (Poland), Olga Konopliova (Belarus) and Mateusz Zwierzyński (Poland).

‘Tenderloin HABITat’ by Sylwia Gudaczewska, Piotr Ołowski, Olga Konopliova and Mateusz Zwierzyński
‘Tenderloin HABITat’ by Sylwia Gudaczewska, Piotr Ołowski, Olga Konopliova and Mateusz Zwierzyński

This project seeks to tackle problems linked with drug usage through social interaction facilitated by urban design. By studying how antisocial, criminal or drug-related habits occurs, the design team has managed to design interventions which turn these negatives into positives. In doing so, the Tenderloin transformed into a brighter neighbourhood through a re-invigorated social programme. New public spaces are proposed in response to antisocial behaviour cycles, each themed into four zones – art, open market, park, theatre – which seek to highlight the existing identities found in the tenderloin and bring them to the surface.

The jury particularly loved the way the design team’s approach was dictated by a strong social analysis. The design has people at its heart, and the urban design which we see emerge in the proposal are a direct response to the needs of those people.

Read more about the project here.


HONOURABLE MENTION:

‘Greenloin’ by Andrés Bruzzese (Uruguay), Juan Camps (Uruguay), Ignacio Correa (Uruguay) and Santiago Cazales (Uruguay).

‘Greenloin’ by Andrés Bruzzese, Juan Camps, Ignacio Correa and Santiago Cazales
‘Greenloin’ by Andrés Bruzzese, Juan Camps, Ignacio Correa and Santiago Cazales

“The creation of public spaces in the neighbourhood must take priority over private developments in order to feed social life and urban vitality”, this is the design’s team’s ethos which informed the design of their proposal ‘Greenloin’. In this design, the Tenderloin is re-imagined with green and vegetation as the key to its revitalisation. The design team identifies areas of opportunities for the greening of the Tenderloin to be rooftops and what they call ‘Level Zero’ (or street level). It becomes a park-neighbourhood. We see the emergence of public urban beaches, forests, street-parks, community gardens and city farming spots. Along with the physical greens in the form of planting trees and plants, we also see new green infrastructure take over the neighbourhood, such as the use of clean energy and an emphasis on bike lanes over cars. ‘Greenloin’ is an exciting new hybrid of urban and natural for the heart of San Francisco, which is intended to transform the Tenderloin into a unique bio-urban model which would eventually take over San Francisco: “the project serves as a seed for San Francisco… an open-ended project that can evolve over time… a green network that grows through the city as if it were a vine.”

The jury was captivated by this design. The proposal is perhaps less feasible then some other more urban interventions, however, the vision of the design team was one which the jury could confidently buy into!

Read more about the project here.


HONOURABLE MENTION:

‘Rich In Convenience’ by Justin Beadle (USA) and Helen Schneider (USA).

‘Rich In Convenience’ by Justin Beadle and Helen Schneider
‘Rich In Convenience’ by Justin Beadle and Helen Schneider

The San Francisco-based design team behind ‘Rich In Convenience’ based their proposal around a re-imagined Single Room Occupancy housing (SROs) design. “In one way they are a wonder,” they explain, “not only has their structure helped stave off gentrification, but they also contain an impressive density of life. Sadly, at some point, it reaches capacity and begins to constrain the life of its residents… This is a spatial problem that needs a spatial solution.” The solution which the design team propose is to create new spaces where occupants of SRO’s can begin to inhabit, and in doing so engage with a richer lifestyle that extends beyond the confines of their dense SROs. The spatial approach to this concept comes in the creation of a system of free and flexible Parklets (at ground level) and Rooflets (on the rooftops of the SROs) which provide new diverse spaces. “They provide the program, functions and freedom that the typical SRO lacks,” say the designers, “and invite the neighbourhood out of its constricted rooms and onto the roof, a space of expansive views and growing hope.”

The jury particularly liked the simplicity of the proposal which makes it a very focused and feasible entry with endless possibilities which can be implemented into a real-life programme of SRO revitalisation for the Tenderloin.

Read more about the project here.


HONOURABLE MENTION:

‘Regenerative Intersections’ by Peter Liang (USA), Eric Reeder (USA), Naichi ‘Nestor’ Ou (USA) and Hsin Chin ‘Jean’ Wu (USA).

‘WATERWORKS’ by Peter Liang, Eric Reeder, Naichi ‘Nestor’ Ou and Hsin Chin ‘Jean’ Wu
‘WATERWORKS’ by Peter Liang, Eric Reeder, Naichi ‘Nestor’ Ou and Hsin Chin ‘Jean’ Wu

This proposal uses water as the key behind regenerating the Tenderloin. ‘Waterworks’ proposes to reimagine the role streets have in the Tenderloin. In particular, it focuses on the intersections and transformed them in nodes of social interaction and employment through the use of water. In doing so, it transformed the Tenderloin into a new hydro-urban model, one which speaks of cyclical water-based micro-infrastructure central to rich social interactions. The project also highlights a strategy for water crisis management and prevention for California, a part of the world which is particularly prone to severe droughts.

The jury appreciated how the design team combined the specific problematics of the Tenderloin into the greater problems of the state of California into a design which is as elegant as it is imaginative. It loved the idea of using water as a regenerator and found it very original. It brought forth contemporary visions of the great ancient Roman bath houses which too acted as important hubs for social interaction at the time.

Read more about the project here.


HONOURABLE MENTION:

‘Opt[IN]’ by Michelle Lauren Zucker (USA) and Karla Diaz (USA).

‘Opt[IN]’ by Michelle Lauren Zucker and Karla Diaz
‘Opt[IN]’ by Michelle Lauren Zucker and Karla Diaz
 

‘Opt[IN]’ responds to the current socio-economic problematics present in the Tenderloin by developing a coherent regenerative strategy that is aimed at creating a diverse social ecosystem where all residents can thrive. “Opt[in] perpetuates a community-driven platform for sustainable urban growth”, explain the design team. The outcome is a masterplan designed to enrich the Tenderloin by gradually retrofitting and redeveloping existing infrastructure, while at the same time focusing on investing in social capital and an improved quality of the built environment. The end result is a masterplan which has a very strong civic concern, and which is designed specifically to counteract the effects of Gentrification, such as the displacement of local population and a search for a new manufactured identity.

The jury enjoyed this proposal and chose it as one of their Honourable Mentions due to its ambition and methodical care the design team took in developing a coherent masterplan which the jury can imagine successful in real-life policy making towards a new regenerative model for the Tenderloin.

Read more about the project here.


Eleven would like to thank the amazing jury team behind the Competition, consisting of: Amy Frearson (Deputy Editor of Architecture, Dezeen), The Buckminster Fuller Institute, Carlos Arnaiz (CAZA), Chris White (BIG), Hasdai Westbrook (Editor, Impact Design Hub), John Barton (Dean of Architecture, Stanford University), Jonny McKenna (Metropolitan Workshop), Karen Nelson (Dean, BAC), Leon Rost (BIG), Lewis Knight (Gensler), Kristi Loui (Gensler), Matthew Mazzotta (MIT), NAP+P Architects  (Winner of Cambodia 2015: consisting of members Natthapol Pongplanchai, Phanin Chantalert, Porncharoen Oranratmanee, Pratchaya Lertruck Sadee), Roger Hawkins (Hawkins/Brown), Trent Tesch (KPF), Andrea Verenini (Editor of Eleven).

Eleven would also like to extend a big THANK YOU to all of our competition entries for the fantastic designs they have submitted. All entries have shown an incredible amount of talent, innovation, and has brought to light some very interesting ideas, designs and concepts.