Why go to Mars? Is it because of the celebrated altruistic curiosity that we are trying to satisfy? Is it because we have destroyed the Earth beyond repair that we have to escape before the Earth destroys us? Or is it because Mars presents itself as a tabula rasa that allow humans to learn from our mistake and start fresh?

The project celebrates human egomania while at the same time critiques and warns how this act of hubris will potentially lead to a failed utopia. Using the Bible as a departure point, this project illustrates that the dichotomy between utopia and dystopia is not as clear cut as it might seem.

The project is split into two parts, referencing the Book of Genesis for the biblical creation of Earth; and the 7 deadly sins mentioned throughout the remainder of the Bible. The intention of such comparison is that, like within the bible, one can have intention to create the infrastructure for a utopia just like God did, but ultimately the impossibility to govern how humans occupy space and the imperfection of human traits will inevitably turn this utopia into a dystopia if nothing has been done to fundamentally change the prevailing anthropocentrism and review humans’ relationship with the environment.

We believe that the progression of Mars colonisation as a chapter of human civilisation history will be the construction of a physical utopia designed by idealists, which will then be occupied by the second wave of Mars immigrants that have been enjoying a hedonistic lifestyle back on Earth. The new social construct with the advancement of technology will probably mean the elimination of labour, and hence currency on Mars. Such stagnation will most likely further the shallow hedonistic lifestyle that is depicted as the seven deadly sins.

Hence, in this proposal, we would like to contrast the idealistic utopian vision and intention of the Mars colony when it is constructed; with the dystopian agony when the colony has been occupied for generations.